The FUTURE PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates a continuous action that will be completed at some point in the future. This tense is formed with the modal “WILL” plus the modal “HAVE” plus “BEEN” plus the present participle of the verb (with an -ing ending): “Next Thursday, I will have been working on this project for three years.”

Q: When is the future not like the future?
A: When it’s the past.

Vinyl is making a comeback. It’s been making a comeback for years; we’ve all heard that. And now, all the well-informed people will tell you that the comeback is over — indeed, the whole thing was just a sham for poseurs in the first place. But behind the clickbaity headlines (which often wildly exaggerate the claims of the actual articles) it seems increasingly clear to me that something is definitely going on in Vinyland. Yes, production quality might be variable, and the albums that are selling tend to be old albums that have already shifted millions of units, but people are excited about them. Continue reading

So in my travels I stumbled across this article on the 150 albums created by women.

This prompted me to write a long, angry, ranty blog post about how badly I think female artists have been treated by music critics (indeed by critics of all the arts), which I then deleted. I then wrote another much more moderate blog from scratch, and that also turned into a long angry ranty blog post. And so this time I showed it to Hannah, and said: can you just have a look at this for me? I’m not quite happy with what I’m saying here, but I’m not quite sure why.

And she said that, whilst it would basically be fine to publish with maybe a few tweaks, there was perhaps a very outside chance that some readers might interpret it as… possibly… mansplaining Feminism.

Which is exactly the thing I was worried about but couldn’t quite put my finger on.

Being male, my second-hand outrage is of no real importance to anyone, even me. And it wasn’t even supposed to be my original point. So here I go one last time, with that pitfall in mind. Continue reading

The tagline of the Eulogize This site is ‘Praising the peaks of culture’.  Culture is music, literature, drama, cinema, painting, ceramics, architecture… it’s the epic artistic statements that form the basis of tourist attractions, pub quizzes and Monty Python sketches.  But of course it’s also much more than that.  Aside from ‘timeless’ culture, there is also everyday culture: advertisements, jingles, internet memes, gossip, and the style of television documentaries known as reality TV.  These things are generally not given the same acclaim, and they’re not designed to get it.  They’re built to be kind of disposable: the Amazon packing cardboard of our shared experience.  But in this article I would like to sing the praises of one such reality TV show — DIY SOS : The Big Build. Continue reading

So I finally got a Spotify account.

I’ve been spending ages asking everyone I know: where are people finding new music these days? What’s the place everyone goes to? Is it still radio – does radio mean anything anymore?

And the response has generally been: ‘well, for me it’s mostly Spotify’.

And I’ve said: yeah yeah, but apart from that. Apart from Spotify… I mean I know people use it. I know streaming is supposed to be the future of music, but is it really? Are people really using it, like they used to listen to CDs or vinyl? Is it really a substitute for actually owning the tracks? Isn’t it all messy and incoherent? Is the listening experience actually any good? Continue reading

This month’s Featured Modern Track is I Wish There Was A Pill.

A lot of time has passed since I wrote it. And, as with The Big Striptease, I occasionally wonder whether I still stand by what it says. With the latter, I feel I’ve changed. With the former, I feel perhaps the world has changed. I get the sense that in this country in the 10 years since the song was written there has been much more recognition of the importance of, and difficulty of, treating mental health issues.

I think I was frustrated with what seemed to me like a society that was only capable of dealing with depression with some form of pill. Dealing with a problem in the hardware rather than the software, so to speak. But over that decade I’ve really come to appreciate that the antidepressants that I name-check at the start of the song can literally mean the difference between life and death for millions of people who take them. For so many people it really is a hardware problem, and the purpose of the drugs is to allow those who take them to live a normal life, or something close to it, rather than some blissed out existence.

I wanted to make that point in its own blog post, because I think that the song could seem just like a glib dismissal of mental health problems far more severe than anything I’ve ever had to deal with.

Continue reading