The FUTURE PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates a continuous action that will be completed at some point in the future. This tense is formed with the modal “WILL” plus the modal “HAVE” plus “BEEN” plus the present participle of the verb (with an -ing ending): “Next Thursday, I will have been working on this project for three years.”

Q: When is the future not like the future?
A: When it’s the past.

Vinyl is making a comeback. It’s been making a comeback for years; we’ve all heard that. And now, all the well-informed people will tell you that the comeback is over — indeed, the whole thing was just a sham for poseurs in the first place. But behind the clickbaity headlines (which often wildly exaggerate the claims of the actual articles) it seems increasingly clear to me that something is definitely going on in Vinyland. Yes, production quality might be variable, and the albums that are selling tend to be old albums that have already shifted millions of units, but people are excited about them. Continue reading

Photo by David Bleasdale (CC BY 2.0)

The last full album I recorded under my own name was in 2013.  Since then I’ve done plenty of gigs, produced an album for someone else, written a lot of blog and social media posts…

What I haven’t done is release any new music.  Which is odd, considering I consider myself primarily a recording artist.

So why not?  Well, paying the bills, to be honest.  And it takes so long to organise all the other stuff that I tend to try to get it out of the way first, and then do the fun part (recording music) when I have time.

Well, I realised quite a while ago that, realistically, I’ll never have time.  Not unless I make time. Continue reading